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Healthy breakfasts, healthy pupils

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Some keys points of the article:

  • The Cardiff University study asked 5,000 nine to 11-year-olds to list what they ate in 24 hours. The study involved more than 100 primary schools in Wales and was built on research started 10 years ago.
  • Lead author Hannah Littlecott, from Cardiff University, said the odds of achieving above average performance were up to twice as high for pupils who ate a healthy breakfast than for those who did not.
  • Children who eat a healthy breakfast are more likely to do well in end of primary school assessments than those who do not.
  • The odds of achieving an above average performance was up to twice as high for pupils who ate breakfast, compared with those who did not.
  • Co-author Dr Graham Moore said the data provided “robust evidence of a link between eating breakfast and doing well at school”.
  • Public Health Wales welcomed the study’s findings, saying they support the case for schools to consider measures to improve children’s diets.
  • It is the first time a direct link between pupils’ breakfast quality and consumption and their educational attainment has been demonstrated.

We think unhealthy breakfasts for children are those high in sugar or refined carbohydrates. We recommend eggs and healthy fats like avocado. We also love plain yoghurt with fresh fruit, nuts or coconut flakes added. Plain oats are also good with fresh fruit or nuts and yoghurt. Some low sugar cereals like weetbix certainly aren’t going to hurt for active children. Feel free to break the mould too..sometimes last night’s left overs from a healthy dinner can be a great way to start the day!

To watch the video and read the full article, click here!

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